Steve Rubel on Transmedia Storytelling

The walls have fallen. Content is contextual and we’re living more of our days surrounding by a technologically imbued narrative. Tell the stories that matter will yah? To borrow a phrase … just do it.

Amplify’d from www.steverubel.com

The Rise of the Corporate Transmedia Storyteller

Nicholas Carr in his book “The Shallows” argues that the digital deluge is rewiring our brains for less depth. NYU professor Clay Shirky, meanwhile, says in his book Cognitive Surplusthat as more of us become content creators rather than consumers, it’s ushering in a new age of enlightenment.

Regardless of which side of the debate you buy into, one that sees superficiality rising versus another that envisions a new Renaissance, one thing remains clear. Space on the Internet is infinite. Time and attention, meanwhile, remain finite. Therefore, “Digital Relativity” will become a major challenge.

Enter the Transmedia Storyteller.

Even though millions of us are now content producers in some form or another, the reality is there’s still chasm when it comes to quality. There’s art and there’s junk. Audiences want art.

Transmedia Storytelling doesn’t need to be fancy. It can be executed with low budget tools. However, it does need to be thought through. It requires that a business’ subject matter experts know how to simultaneously tell good stories and to do so using text, video, audio and images depending on the venue.

Transmedia storytelling is the future of marketing. And those who can span across formats and share their expertise will stand out in an age of Digital Relativity. There’s a first-mover advantage here. However, it remains to be seen who will grab the ring.

Read more at www.steverubel.com

Brain and Tech Books

Amplify’d from www.usatoday.com
Clay Shirky,
author of the new book (and antipode to Carr’s thesis) Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age.
Nicholas Car
, The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains.
Gary Small
author with Gigi Vorgan of iBrain: Surviving the Technological Alteration of the Modern Mind.Read more at www.usatoday.com